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Strengthening and balance activities evidence review webinar, Thursday 5 July, Online

This webinar from Public Health England presents evidence on muscle and bone strengthening and balance activities, and will include a discussion of the relevance of the findings for falls prevention, commissioning physical activity programmes and practical implications for commissioners and health and exercise professionals.

Dr Charlie Foster, Chair of the UK Chief Medical Officers’ (CMOs’) Expert Group on Physical Activity, will present and lead discussions on findings and implications of a new evidence review on muscle and bone strengthening and balance activities for health. The report provides a unique synthesis of the evidence for strength and balance activities to improve general health and physical capacity at any age, and – in middle and older age – maintain and improve function and reducing early death.

FaithAction believes that these findings could be relevant to many faith organisations that work with older people. Please find below further details and a link to access the webinar on the day.

Background

Historically the recommended 150 minutes cardiovascular activity has been the focus of physical activity for individual and population health, but less than 1 in 3 men (31%) and less than 1 in 4 women (23%) are also achieving the CMOs’ ‘forgotten’ strengthening and balance elements of the physical activity guidelines. Addressing the hidden issue of poor muscle and bone health and balance has potential to improve public health and address burdens on the NHS and social care (e.g. poor strength and balance is a major preventable cause of falls which cost the NHS alone around £1bn per year).

To address the poor level of awareness, achievement and monitoring of the strength and balance elements of the CMOs’ physical activity guidelines amongst professionals and the public, Public Health England and the Centre for Ageing Better commissioned the UK Chief Medical Officers’ Expert Group on physical activity to undertake an evidence review into muscle and bone strengthening and balance activities for health.

The final report is the culmination of a set of evidence reviews by leading UK academics on the topic which have been synthesised into key findings with suggestions for actions for the public, policy maker and practitioners.

Speakers

  • Dr Charlie Foster, Chair of the UK CMOs Expert Group / University of Bristol
  • Louise Ansari, Director of Communications, Centre for Ageing Better
  • Daniel MacIntyre, Population Health Services Manager, PHE

Who the webinar is for

This webinar is relevant to practitioners and policy makers with an interest in physical activity across public health, local authorities, sports and leisure, the NHS and the Voluntary and Community sector. It will discuss the relevance of these findings for falls prevention, commissioning physical activity programmes and practical implications for health and exercise professionals. It will include a question and answer session.

 How to join

Use the following link to join the webinar on the day. This link uses Skype for Business, but if you do not have Skype for Business, clink the link anyway and then click on “Join Using Skype for Business Web App instead” and follow the instructions.

Join Skype Meeting

If you cannot join online, you can join by phone. Dial +44 208 495 3300 from a normal phone, and use Conference ID: 3242239

What is a webinar? 

A webinar is an online seminar. You will usually need a computer that is connected to the internet, and a telephone. You will see PowerPoint slides presented on your computer screen, and there is usually an opportunity to type in a ‘chat’ box at the side of the screen if you have any questions. In order to hear the presenter and participants, you can either phone in to the meeting, or request that the meeting automatically phones you, which is free, even to a mobile. You hear the meeting audio over your phone, like a conference call, while watching your screen. You can usually ask questions or make comments if you want to, but you don’t have to if you want to just listen.