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#FaithinPartnership

Three new reports on partnership working between faith and local government.

Service praised for coping with cuts and riots

A report by the Probation Inspectorate found that Haringey Youth Offending Service was working in “a demanding environment”, having faced funding cuts and being forced to move offices but was able to deliver reasonable results given the circumstances.

Safeguarding aspects of the team’s work were deemed to have been done well enough 62 per cent of the time, compared to 68 per cent nationally.

Work to keep to a minimum each individual’s risk of harm to others was done well enough 57 per cent of the time compared to 63 per cent nationally, and the work to make each individual less likely to reoffend was done well enough 61 per cent of the time compared to 71 per cent nationally.

Despite the below average scores inspectors said they considered it “a reasonable set of findings”.

“The diverse needs of service users raised a number of challenges for the service including responding effectively to knife crime and gang-related violence, and providing services to children and young people who could be both perpetrators and victims of crime,” Julie Fox, assistant chief inspector, said.

“As a result of funding reductions, the YOS had lost a number of external grants and undergone changes to its internal delivery structures.

“Moreover, during the London summer disturbances of 2011 the YOS offices had been rendered unusable by fire and the team had been required to relocate to new premises.

“Despite these challenges, case managers showed enthusiasm to improve their practice and YOS staff engaged well with children and young people to deliver the sentence of the court.”

A separate report on Sutton youth offending team found that safeguarding aspects of work were done well enough 80 per cent the time, public protection aspects 76 per cent of the time, and the work to reduce reoffending 82 per cent of the time.

“We found a staff team committed to delivering high quality interventions with children and young people, supported by effective partnership working,” Andy Smith, assistant chief inspector, said.

A report on Waltham Forest youth offending team found that safeguarding work was done well enough 68 per cent of the time, public protection work 62 per cent of the time, and the work to reduce reoffending 73 per cent of the time.

Inspectors described the results as “encouraging”.

“Waltham Forest was a challenging place to work, but case managers were keen and committed to doing their best for the children and young people who had offended,” Julie Fox said.

This article was taken from www.cypnow.co.ukhttp://www.cypnow.co.uk/cyp/news/1072837